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The Official News Source of Florida State University


FSU Police Department earns highest level of state accreditation

The Florida State University Police Department was awarded its fifth consecutive certificate of reaccreditation Nov. 1 during a conference of the Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation in Weston.

The FSUPD earned the commission’s Excelsior Recognition, the highest level of achievement in Florida accreditation a criminal justice agency can receive. The Excelsior Recognition program distinguishes some of the finest criminal justice agencies in Florida that have demonstrated a level of commitment to the Florida Accreditation process unparalleled in the criminal justice profession.

“Accreditation is an important component within the FSU Police Department,” said David L. Perry, assistant vice president for safety and chief of police. “Maintaining sound policies and procedures is an expectation for any agency charged with providing services to the public. We are extremely proud of the Excelsior Recognition as it reaffirms our commitment to safety to the campus community.”

The Florida Accreditation Commission meets three times per year to oversee the accreditation program and to officially accredit agencies that have passed the rigorous review process.

“Florida State University is committed to providing a safe environment for our entire campus community,” said Kyle Clark, vice president of Finance and Administration. “FSUPD’s fifth consecutive accreditation is a testament to the hard work and professionalism the department exhibits on a daily basis.”

The FSU Police Department employs 75 sworn officers and is responsible for law enforcement, Parking and Transportation Services, Campus Access and Security Services, and emergency management on campus properties. The six other agencies that received Excelsior Recognition serve populations ranging from 320,000 to 1 million people with sheriff’s departments of more than 200 sworn deputies.